I Wish I Would, Don't You?

I wonder...I wander, and wish I really would * Write such wise and witty words that they could weave a wondrous world * Where will o' wisps and winged things can whisper to the wind * Which also carries werewolves' howls and wary yowls within * The wizards watch, and whirl and whir, and work their wily spells * While warriors wield their weapons, and the women wait at wells. * Wild wand'rers wake near waterfalls, and waifs wail out their woes. * And I, their warden, willingly, will walk where'er they go * Wreak war on them, win peace for them, and hold them while they weep. * For I will love what I have wrought, and as their writer I them keep.

I think a huge mistake we make is not allowing ourselves to feel. Whenever I’m driving in my car and a memory pops into my head that forms a lump in my throat my first instinct is to immediately shut it away. But I try to force myself to feel it, the loss. I let myself cry and slam my fists into the steering wheel because I know my mind needs my body. Sometimes the spaces in our head aren’t big enough for the pain we feel and it’s our bodies job to set it free.

—Jenna Anne (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: loveless-people, via ofthebluestskies)

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.
PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

(Source: stupidimagesforcraziestpeople)

medievalpoc:

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.
Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.
What you’ll need:
circular knitting needles
yarn
small scales
You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.
Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!
(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)
Read More

I’m gonna go ahead and put this under the resources tag for reenactors, cosplayers, Rennies and SCA-ers!

medievalpoc:

myrddin-emrys:

Disclaimer: This is not my own idea; I got the tip from the lovely Elentari-liv, who was kind enough to share her technique with me. This is only showing the basics I’ve used to knit the scales, not how to make any certain piece.

Also, keep in mind that I’m still a beginner at knitting. I’ve been doing it for approximately two weeks.

What you’ll need:

  • circular knitting needles
  • yarn
  • small scales

You’ll probably want to choose a yarn close to your scale colour, or one that complements it (I used a contrasting one here to make things easier to show). You may have to experiment a bit with the yarn gauge and size of the needles. I ended up using gauge three yarn and size six needles after some testing. Larger needles widened the gap between scales, so that the yarn was visible in between, which I didn’t want, and thicker yarn made the scales stick out too much as opposed to hanging. It looked like I was knitting a very ruffled dragon.

Scales can be purchased from The Ring Lord, with multiple choices of colour and material. I’ve experimented with both aluminum and steel; the steel seems to hang better because of its weight, but it all depends on what you need for your project!

(I’m putting the actual process under a read more because I do have a lot of photos.)

Read More

I’m gonna go ahead and put this under the resources tag for reenactors, cosplayers, Rennies and SCA-ers!

fawnbro:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.
"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."
"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."


(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)
This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

That bullshit heart surgery example doesn’t even make sense though, does that person think that we’re still doing heart surgery the exact same way we’ve always done heart surgery? As if medicine isn’t constantly changing and updating? Wow it’s almost like people are finding excuses to not have to think critically about the world!

fawnbro:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

That bullshit heart surgery example doesn’t even make sense though, does that person think that we’re still doing heart surgery the exact same way we’ve always done heart surgery? As if medicine isn’t constantly changing and updating? Wow it’s almost like people are finding excuses to not have to think critically about the world!

(Source: uvmsemba, via ofthebluestskies)

tenaflyviper:

If you can’t find a place on your blog for Patrick Stewart in a bathtub dressed like a lobster, then your blog probably doesn’t deserve such majesty anyway.

tenaflyviper:

If you can’t find a place on your blog for Patrick Stewart in a bathtub dressed like a lobster, then your blog probably doesn’t deserve such majesty anyway.

(Source: digg, via infobabble)